A Virtual Reality Train Ride & Height & Paranoia

As anyone who’s been to a gig and isn’t six feet tall has probably experienced, being surrounded by people taller than you—why does that always happen?—can be annoying at best, and kind of scary at worst. There’s a certain vulnerability that comes with suddenly feeling shorter than those around you. A paper published online today in the journal Psychiatry Research looks at part of this phenomenon, by investigating the relation between height and paranoia.

The study, which was led by researchers at Oxford University and funded by the Medical Research Council, found that being shorter made people feel more mistrustful of those around them. They came to this conclusion after a virtual reality experiment in which participants took two virtual rides on the London Underground; one at their own height, and one with their height artificially reduced by 25cm about a head. They weren’t told that their line of sight had been lowered until after the study.

 

via A Virtual Reality Train Ride Reveals a Link Between Height and Paranoia | Motherboard.

And for anyone whose immediate reaction is “duhh wear heels then” — yes. That is spectacular advice for people taking public transportation who are already anxious and paranoid about those around them. Knowing a toddler could probably outrun you really eases the fear.

And no, I don’t want to use the easy “walk a mile in someone else’s shoes” reference, but I just did 😦


police blotter: woman claims she keeps seeing cleaning women

Woman claims she keeps seeing cleaning women: North Royalton Police Blotter

SUSPICIOUS PERSON, ROYALTON ROAD: A woman reported about 10 a.m. June 2 that three or four women, ages 25-30, came to her house the day before to clean.

The problem was that they never left. In fact, they were coming and going to the house as if they lived there.

To make matters worse, the woman said, when she tried to touch the cleaning women, they would disappear.

via Woman claims she keeps seeing cleaning women: North Royalton Police Blotter | cleveland.com.

 

You guys.

You guys.

You guys, listen.

YOUGUYS.

Who ya gonna call? GHOST DUSTERS.

 

 

(nailed it)


rejection affection

gstein

If you need some encouragement, rejection letters of the immensely talented are always helpful.

Self-help books often advise that the fastest way to achieve success is through failure: failing often and failing up. Even great writers like George Orwell suffered setbacks, like when his novel Animal Farm was rejected as a “stupid and pointless fable” by Knopf Publishers in 1945. So when the Sundance Film Festival asked artist and photographer Taryn Simon to create something to kick off its Free Fail campaign, a series of panels “designed to embrace failure as essential to risk-taking, innovation, and the creative process,” she decided to make a video flip book of rejection letters.

But in the blink-and-you’ll-miss-it section between those two bookends is: A rejection letter from the music label Sub Pop that begins “Dear Loser,” a denial from the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Clown College, and a rejection of a Star Trek spec script. There is also a letter – recently noted by Meryl Streep in her National Board of Review gala speech honoring Emma Thompson and slamming Walt Disney – that explains to one aspiring female artist in the 1930s that women were not welcome to do “the creative work in connection with preparing the cartoons for the screen, as that task is performed entirely by young men.”

via The Rejection Letters That Burned Everyone From George Orwell to Aspiring Clowns | Underwire | Wired.com.